• Report/Issue Brief

    This Time, With Feeling: Integrating Social and Emotional Development and College- and Career-Readiness Standards (2017)

    The goal of this report is to help educators understand the mutually reinforcing relationship between social and emotional development and ambitious academic goals. Instruction that promotes students’ social and emotional development (SED) facilitates better student outcomes on college- and career-ready (CCR) standards. The converse is also true: Learning environments structured to genuinely meet rigorous standards support the development of students’ social and emotional skills. To promote deeper learning, educators need to make the most of this interconnected relationship, and to approach SED not as an add-on or discrete intervention, but as an integral part of the academic program.


    Johnson, H. & Weiner, R. (2017) This Time, With Feeling: Integrating Social and Emotional Development and College- and Career-Readiness Standards. New York: Aspen Institute.



  • Research Study

    The Economic Value of Social and Emotional Learning (2015)

    This report reviews the available evidence on the economic value of social and emotional learning (SEL). The most important empirical finding is that each of the six interventions under consideration for improving SEL shows measurable benefits that exceed its costs, often by considerable amounts. The aggregate result also shows an average benefit-cost ratio of about 11 to 1 among the six interventions.


    Belfield, C., Bowden, B., Klapp, A., Levin, H., Shand, R., & Zander, S. (2015). The Economic Value of Social and Emotional Learning. New York: Center for Benefit-Cost Studies in Education.



  • Research Study

    Ready to Be Counted: The Research Case for Education Policy Action on Non-Cognitive Skills (2015)

    Many studies have demonstrated that “non-cognitive” competencies in children are important predictors of outcomes in their lives as adults. In several cases, the data show that non-cognitive skills matter as much as or even more than cognitive or academic skills in predicting positive life outcomes. This working paper maps findings from a number of pivotal studies conducted by leading psychologists, physicians, economists, and education researchers onto a framework organized around nine key topics within the domains of academics, career, and well-being.


    Gabrieli, C., Ansel, D., & Krachman, S. B. (2015). Ready to Be Counted: The Research Case for Education Policy Action on Non-Cognitive Skills. Boston: Transforming Education.



  • Report/Issue Brief

    Ready for Work? How Afterschool Programs Can Support Employability Through Social and Emotional Learning (2015)

    This brief, part of the American Institutes for Research’s “Beyond the Bell: Research to Action in the Afterschool and Expanded Learning Field” series, shares how SEL programs and practices can support the development of employability skills and how after-school and expanded learning settings are an ideal place for this learning to happen.


    American Institutes for Research. (2015). Ready for Work? How Afterschool Programs Can Support Employability Through Social and Emotional Learning. Chicago: Author.



  • Report/Issue Brief

    Improving College and Career Readiness by Incorporating Social and Emotional Learning (2013)

    This issue brief, published by the American Institutes for Research, assists state policymakers in better understanding how social and emotional learning (SEL) can help students to be college and career ready. The brief provides a short description of what SEL is, why it is needed, and what it looks like in practice.


    Dymnicki, A., Sambolt, M., & Kidron, Y. (2013). Improving College and Career Readiness by Incorporating Social and Emotional Learning. Washington DC: American Institutes for Research College & Career Readiness and Success Center.



  • Article

    Boosting Social and Emotional Competence (2007)

    This article outlines approaches to effective implementation of social and emotional learning at the high school level.


    Beland, K. (2007). Boosting social and emotional competence. Educational Leadership, April 2007, 64(7), 68-71.